Tag: 江浙沪娱乐地图

‘Scorpions were let down by poor batting’

No Comments

first_imgTop batsman AndrÈ McCarthy says poor batting led to Jamaica’s below-par showing during the WICB/NAGICO Insurance Super50 Tournament.Jamaica had three wins and as many defeats in Group A before bowing out after finishing third of four teams.”It’s the losing of quick wickets,” said the Scorpions top batsman, a member of the squad, which returned home on Wednesday.”When we batted, we tended to lose two or three quick wickets, which set us back.”It’s something that we need to look into, and work on, as our batting is what has been letting us down over the years.”The Junior Bennett-conditioned Scorpions amassed 14 points, four less than second-place Barbados Pride, who recorded four wins and two defeats.Hosts and title-holders Trinidad and Tobago Red Force ended tops with 22 points following four wins, a loss, and a no-result.The other contenders, ICC Americas, claimed two points.”The guys are not happy about the situation (early exit),” said McCarthy, who topped the preliminary batting chart with 251 runs at an average of 41.83.”After playing and getting knocked out in the first round, the players are disappointed, and taking it hard.”But everybody has to just learn from their mistakes and try and improve,” McCarthy added.The early exit of Jamaica, a far cry from their title-winning exploits four seasons ago under Chris Gayle, occurred with the team passing 200 just twice in six innings.These were against minnows ICC Americas, where they posted 260 for eight before returning to limit their opponents to 76, and 257 for nine in response to 253 for eight.bowled out for 137They were bowled out for 137 in their opening match in chase of 221 against Trinidad, while in their third game, they limped to 139 for eight in pursuit of 138 made by Barbados.Their fourth game, a return-fixture with Trinidad, then saw them being restricted to 176 before the hosts responded with a comfortable 177 for three.Needing to win their penultimate match against Barbados to guarantee themselves a place in the semi-finals, the Scorpions were then held to 173 in chase of 246 for nine.”As batters, we need to think about game situations more,” continued McCarty, the leading scorer for Jamaica in the regional first-class tournament.last_img read more

California’s Real Water Crisis

No Comments

first_imgColorado River: the third big concernThe third concern is the Colorado River. The Colorado is the largest single source of water for Southern California, but it is primarily fed by precipitation from faraway sources in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. The Colorado water has served to mitigate the effects of local droughts. Each year, 16.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water is apportioned to the states of the Colorado Basin and Mexico. California has been allotted the largest share of the river’s water, some 4.4 million acre-feet each year. Prior to 2004, California was able to lay claim to additional “surplus” waters that could total 1 million acre-feet or more of additional water annually.Now, however, several challenges confront this potential source of drought relief. The original apportionment of 15 million acre-feet was devised in the 1920s based on an estimated annual discharge of 17 million acre-feet. Over the 20th century, however, the long-term average discharge of the river has only been 15 million acre-feet. Thus, there is a systemic over-allocation of the water, and in 2003 California agreed to wean itself down to no more than a 4.4 million acre-feet allocation.Like most of the Southwest, the Colorado River basin has also experienced generally hot and arid conditions over the early 21st century. The flow of the Colorado River has declined and the water stored in its massive reservoir system has dropped precipitously. Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the U.S., now stands at 37% of its maximum capacity.The Bureau of Reclamation recently projected that by January 2017 the surface elevation of Lake Mead will have fallen to below 1,075 feet above sea level. This will invoke a federal water shortage declaration and a reduction in water appropriations to Nevada by 4.3 percent and Arizona by 11.4 percent. Although California with its senior rights will not take a cut, it is conceivable that there will be political and public pressure on California in terms of its senior rights. In the history of Lake Mead and the Colorado River management, there has never been a water shortage declaration.Recent research by the Bureau of Reclamation estimates that future climate warming alone will lead to a 10% increase in evaporation in Lake Mead as the 21st century progresses. Just as in the case of California’s groundwater, the Colorado River has been oversubscribed, and the drought lifeline afforded by the river is further shrinking as the climate warms. Heavy reliance on groundwaterSecond, increased reliance on groundwater has been an important mechanism by which California coped with past droughts. However, the groundwater resources of the state are displaying clear signs of unsustainability.Over the past 150 years, agricultural and domestic extraction has caused water table depths to fall by 100 or so feet in some instances, and the deep aquifer water level to decline by even greater depths in parts of the San Joaquin Valley, one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. In some places the land surface itself has subsided by more than 20 feet. The current drought has led to increased demands on groundwater in regions such as the San Joaquin Valley, where more than 2,400 well permits were issued in 2013 as the drought hit home.Analysis of such trends and new groundwater storage data collected by NASA’s GRACE satellite has led NASA hydrologist Jay Famiglietti to suggest that the collapse of the San Joaquin groundwater reserves may be only decades away. In 2014, more than 1,400 domestic water supply problems largely related to groundwater were reported in California, with more than half in the San Joaquin Valley.Going forward this century, the San Joaquin Valley is projected to experience high degrees of warming, and this will greatly increase agricultural water demands in the region. The strategy of drought relief through increased exploitation of groundwater here and elsewhere in the state has reached its limits. The road aheadTen years ago, my colleagues and I framed this situation as a perfect drought that affects local Southern California precipitation, extra-regional supplies from Northern California, and the external supplies from the Colorado River for periods greater than one or two years. What we are experiencing today is indeed a perfect drought, but it is also something beyond that.We looked at Southern California’s perfect droughts as discrete events. Although hydrologically droughts are indeed discrete events, and the current one will come to a close sooner or later, this drought should focus our attention on the fact that things have changed in terms of the context in which these droughts occur. The rising temperatures will, year by year, increase the demands for water, particularly in our agricultural sector, which accounts for about 80 percent of the applied water in the state. Due to the ever-increasing rates of evaporation, each future drought will have a deeper bite than the previous one. The current drought afflicting California is indeed historic, but not because of the low precipitation totals. In fact, in terms of overall precipitation and spring snowpack, the past three years are not record-breakers, according to weather data for the past century.Similarly, paleoclimate studies show that the current drought is not exceptional given the natural variations in precipitation of the past seven centuries. Nor can it be confidently said that the current drought bears the unequivocal imprint of climate change driven by increasing greenhouse gases, since the low precipitation is well within the bounds of natural variability.All this being said, it is also clear that this drought is exceptional and should be seen as an historical turning point. Indeed, California is moving into new — and worrisome — territory for three reasons: rising heat, which causes increased evaporation; the continuing depletion of groundwater supplies; and growing water shortages on the Colorado River, the main external source of water for Southern California.A decade ago, I first wrote about California and the “perfect drought.” Now, unless bold steps are taken to deal with a growing water crisis, California may be facing a future of perfect droughts. Water conservation effortsSo, what is to be done? At the household level, we can continue to change our landscaping mix from lawns and other water-intensive plants to increased use of water-sipping native plants. At the municipal level, we can expand the use of recycled water and desalination, which will likely lead to higher water costs. Stormwater capture will also help on domestic and citywide scales.But the big prize, of course, is agriculture. In many cases water-saving irrigation technologies have already been installed. Now, hard decisions will need to be made about the best crops to grow in a water-stressed environment. These options raise serious economic, rural environmental justice, and food security questions. Some gains can be realized through additional infrastructure for water capture, storage, and distribution. In some cases, though, these infrastructure strategies buck up against important environmental concerns or competing interests, such as the conflict in the Sacramento Delta between water demands of the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California, versus the water rights of local farmers and protection of endangered fish species.No matter what we decide to do, we will not, as we have done in the past, be able to depend upon either groundwater or external water supplies to see us through these hot droughts of the future. Should Lake Mead fall below the turbine intakes and lowest outlets of Hoover Dam, at 895 feet in elevation — as some have predicted — the fact that California has senior water rights will be meaningless. With groundwater, we face an agricultural cataclysm if the aquifers in the San Joaquin and other parts of the state should indeed fail.We need to look at the situation today as representing Tomorrow’s Drought — a view into the hydrological future of California and the West. There is no question we will see similar climatological droughts over the next century. The question is: Will we have the foresight to learn all we can from the current drought and the will to put in place the changes in infrastructure, policy, and public attitudes that will be needed to cope next time around? Whether it is dry again next winter or rains like mad, the hydrological clock is ticking toward an increasingly difficult 21st century. The time to tackle our longterm water challenges is right now. Glen MacDonald is the John Muir Memorial Chair in Geography and a distinguished professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. This column was originally posted at Yale Environment 360 and is reprinted here with permission. The heat is risingFirst, there is the heat. Although the current precipitation deficit cannot be attributed to global climate change, the record-breaking high temperatures of 2014 can be. These elevated temperatures produce increased evaporation from reservoirs and exacerbate irrigation demands.The commonly used Palmer Drought Severity Index, which combines both temperature and precipitation, shows that 2014 is indeed off the charts. This combination of low precipitation and high evaporative losses fuels the crisis now being faced.Climate models do not provide a consensus on the changes in precipitation that might occur in California over the 21st century. Moving forward, there may well be no significant increase or decrease in the average annual precipitation. However, the models do agree that temperatures will continue to rise.Water demands to meet evaporative losses will therefore increase significantly. There is also some evidence that the length and depth of droughts will increase in the later 21st century. As for high temperatures and persistence of extreme conditions, the current drought might well be considered the harbinger of droughts to come.last_img read more

Sorry Kids, Mom And Dad p0wn You On The Net [Infographic]

No Comments

first_imgbrian proffitt Wikibon‘s infographic pulls together a rich collection of stats, including the total data footprints of the three generations. Generation X leads the way, consuming 59.6GB of data per month, with Millennials close behind at 54.GB and Baby Boomers trailing with 44.8GBb.TV vs. WorkWikibon is not just counting computer and mobile surfing habits in its estimates… it’s also added television watching to the tally. While Baby Boomers watch more traditional television than do the other two generations, the combination of traditional and online viewing still pushes the GenXers over the top for the video viewing data footprint.Generation X, defined as those born between 1965-1983, also has a higher percentage of desktop computer owners and spends more time online. But their Millennial kids, born 1984-2002, have a higher percentage of Internet users, and dominate the mobile surfing habits.One reason why Millennials have the lower footprint online than their parents is clearly the lack of television the kids are watching on TV sets (110 hours to their folks’ 145 hours). Much of their video consumption happens online, where Millenials watch nearly 23.5 hours of video a month, compared to the less than 15 hours GenXers watch online.But even taking TV out of the equation, Generation X and even Baby Boomers spend more time surfing on computers than do the young ones. One reason may lie in device preference, because kids are much more likely to use a mobile device than a computer to surf.Another reason may be due to work: many Millennials are still in college, or just entering the workplace, and therefore aren’t online for professional reasons as much as their parents and even their grandparents – who either haven’t retired yet or are working a part-time job.Data Generation Is Exploding!But perhaps the most telling stat in this infographic can be be found at the very top: from the beginning of time until 2003, humans generated 5 billion gigabytes of data. That’s 4.9 million terabytes, or 4.66 exabytes. Right now, we generate that much data every two days… and by 2014, we’ll be creating that much data every 10 minutes. You think data is big now? This is the kind of stat that gets database engineers reaching for the nearest bottle (aspirin, vodka, it doesn’t matter…).As generations continue to adapt to new technologies and create this mega-data, their online habits could change, of course. And that evolution will remain of overwhelming interest to the marketers and entertainment companies who need to know where their intended audiences are hanging out online and what they are doing there. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Which generation rules the Internet? Conventional wisdom has it that the Millennials are the most connected cohort in history. The only problem is that the conventional wisdom may not be true. The inter-generational habits of Internet denizens have been revealed in a numbers-rich infographic posted this week, which reveals that among Baby Boomers, Generation X and the Millennial generations, it’s the GenXers that spend more time online and produce more data than their children and their parents. (More analysis below the infographic…) Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Demographics#Internet#television#web Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

Somewhere between a rock and a hard place

No Comments

first_imgby JoDee ChristiansonHave you ever heard someone say, “I feel like I am caught somewhere between a rock and a hard place?” Growing up on dairy farm in central MN I learned this statement in the physical sense and in the hypothetical. The physical example being when you are out disking the fields and you get a rock stuck between the disk blades you have to pry it loose. If left alone the rock can be damaging to the equipment and ineffective in getting the job done. The hypothetical sense is when you’re faced with making a difficult decision as a result of change in your life made by an outside source (deployments, employers, health diagnosis). The irony in this statement is that I haven’t thought about it in years, but it couldn’t explain my current situation better. In reflection, I owe this trip down memory lane to my recent participation in a four day online conference hosted by the Military Families Learning Network, September 24-27, 2017.It’s important to bring you up to speed on what had been going on in my life in the two months prior to the conference, to fully understand how I found myself somewhere between a rock and a hard place. In July of this year, my oldest son underwent a second major airway reconstruction surgery for a congenital airway anomaly he has had since birth. During this time and the month that followed, I took intermittent family leave from work.We had been through a similar surgery with my son six years prior, so we went into this surgery with confidence and much anticipation for a great outcome, knowing we had been down this path before. We would get through it, and would be back to life as usual, before we knew it. As it turns out, we were confident in the process, but overlooked all of the emotions and sacrifices that came with this life changing moment. Those memories seemed to have faded in that six-year gap between surgeries. We again faced fear versus hope and a lack of trust versus connection and vulnerability. All of those things came back in full swing. As it turned out, even after a twelve-day stay in the ICU, my son healed remarkably quickly. Our stay in Philadelphia, PA for the surgery lessoned from an anticipated 12 weeks to only 4 weeks. The separation from my other two children, ages 6 and 3, lessoned from 12 weeks to 4 weeks, and my time away from work also lessoned from 12 weeks to 4 weeks. Which is great, right? I could get right back into it, work, family, and the kids starting a new school year on time, no problem. Because external healing equates internal healing, right? Wrong! I had been back to work for just 2 weeks when we had a medical emergency with my son, and knew we would have to return to Philadelphia. This set back was paired almost simultaneously with an organizational change within my job. On August 20th we came home from Philadelphia, by August 25th I received news that my supervisor would be changing, and by September 4th my son would have a medical event that stopped my world from spinning. I was cloaked in fear and guilt, looking back at the two weeks from the time of his event to the time we heard the Dr. say, “everything is okay”, I don’t recall doing anything outside of breathing.My son and I returned home September 16th to mountains of prayers that had been met, and the relief of those around us. Two days after our return home from Philadelphia, I was back to work. Relieved and refreshed of course, or so I thought I should have been. But really I hadn’t had time to deal with what all had happened and I was finding myself in the middle of two conflicting changes in my life, both completely out of my control. Everyone around me saw me smile, nod, and heard me say “uh-huh…yes that sounds great.” But I was absolutely paralyzed inside. I had experienced a traumatic event with my son and I was shutting down. What seemed a small shift at work, became profound and an easy target for blame and anger. I was shutting down. I was caught between a rock and a hard place.Enter, the MFLN online conference “Learning through Change: Adapt. Grow. Thrive.” Whether you believe in divine intervention or not, someone was definitely throwing me a life vest. It was up to me to put it on and so I registered and committed to attending each session of the 4-day conference.Now, remember when I talked about the rock in the disk blades when you’re out in the field? In order to dislodge that rock you need some tools — usually a crow bar, but you also need things like determination and persistence, and then with that, you literally have to pry and jolt that rock loose. Dr. Charles Figley’s keynote presentation “Seasons of Change: Promoting Growth during Times of Uncertainty” was my first jolt. I connected with what he had to say, I realized that caring for my son put me in the field of Compassion Fatigue. After the conclusion of his presentation, I spent the next hour clicking through every suggested resource. I reaped all that YouTube had to offer in regards to Dr. Figley’s research, applying it to my personal and professional situations.Feeling that rock, give way just a little after day one, my gateway had been opened. My next jolt came though the presentation by Trisha Wohlfeil titled, “Rising Strong ™ When Faced with Professional Change: My Story, My Ending”. I will forever be grateful for her introduction to the work of Dr. Brene Brown. What a profound message behind sharing your story. Again, I found myself in a click storm of resources that had been shared through the conference’s group chat feature; each one offering a jolt, producing movement. The power of vulnerability; bam! Listening to Shame; bam! To do so “daring greatly”, bam!Now, it would be wonderful to share that this conference has allowed me to completely break free from the hard places that hold on to me so tightly, but I don’t believe that was the purpose. Rather, just as no one presenter, community worker, or military family specialist can make that breakthrough for the audience they are working with. This conference provided connection to resources, tools and a place, for me to begin the work, which I need to do, to lean into, and “learn through change”!JoDee Christianson is a SNAP-Ed Educator with the University of Minnesota, Extension. JoDee is also a spouse, a parent caring for two sons with special medical needs and their sister, amidst the hardwoods of Minnesota.last_img read more

Factional feud of TMC comes to fore after Joynagar killing

No Comments

first_imgThe factional feud of Trinamool Congress came out in open with the killings of the three Trinamool Congress supporters at Joynagar in the State’s South 24 Parganas district. Supporters of Trinamool Congress created a ruckus outside the Joynagar police station during the day. District president of Trinamool Congress Subhasish Chakraborty also faced protests when he went to hold a political meeting in the district.Three persons who were travelling in the vehicle of local MLA of Biswanath Das were shot dead at a petrol pump late on Thursday evening. The MLA had descended from the vehicle a few minutes before the attack. Mr Das said that his supporters were upset after the attack and that resulted in the protests. TMC supporters were publicly seen beating up a person outside the police station in public accusing him of being involved in the attack. Some party supporters were seen saying that were being used as cannon fodder in the rivalry of two factions of the party. 11 arrested for the violenceMeanwhile, the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) of West Bengal Police took over the case on Friday. Since Thursday evening 11 persons have been arrested in connection with the murders. The police is looking at the CCTV footage at the petrol pump to identify the accused to who fired on the TMC MLA’s vehicle. The vehicle has been impounded and will be sent for forensic examination. The police seized a number of bombs from the site of the violence.last_img read more

SOUTH SIOUX CITY SNOW EMERGENCY RULES BEGIN THURSDAY MORNING

No Comments

first_imgThe city of South Sioux City has declared a snow emergency that will take effect beginning Thursday morning at 8am.All vehicles need to be off the Emergency Snow Routes in South Sioux City and odd/even parking will begin March 7th on the odd side of the streets.This needs to be accomplished by 8 AM each morning.Vehicles not in compliance are subject to towing.last_img

Spotted ESL Shippings 2nd LNGFueled Bulker Hits the Water

No Comments

first_imgImage Courtesy: ESL ShippingESL Shipping’s LNG-powered dry cargo vessel Haaga was launched at the Jinling Shipyard in China and moved to the outfitting quay on October 20.Haaga and its sister vessel Viikki are said to be the first LNG-powered handy-size bulk carriers in the world.As explained, the 160-meter-long vessels fueled by LNG produce more than 50 percent lower carbon dioxide emissions than vessels of the previous generation. The 25,600 dwt newbuildings will start operating in the Baltic Sea during the first half of 2018.Haaga’s sister ship Viikki was launched at the end of August and the work has progressed as expected at the outfitting quay, the company said.The construction of the two vessels is part of the Bothnia Bulk project, co-funded partly by the EU. Its objective is to modernize the sea route between Luleå, Oxelösund and Raahe to be more eco-friendly.Helsinki-based ESL Shipping, part of Aspo Plc, is a dry bulk shipping company operating in the Baltic Sea. Its fleet comprises 14 ships and the annual transport volume amounted to 10.7 million tons in 2016.last_img read more