Donation Made to Help Moses Lake Police K9 ProgramFire Crews Douse Small

No Comments

first_imgThe Moses Lake Police Department are getting more help to expand their K9 program after a large donation from local service groups. Kiwanis and Rotary made a $13-thousand donation to the department which will allow them to further develop the K9 program. MLPD’s first K9 officer Chief joined the department in May. They expect to a second K9 before the end of the year. The money was raised through a charity golf tournament as well as donations from local businesses.last_img

LiveBlogging Green House Project Policy Briefing

No Comments

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesphotoIn a policy briefing in the U.S. Capital the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released results from a pilot study showing that Green House project homes save Medicare and Medicaid $1,300 to $2,300 per home resident annually compared to traditional nursing homes. The briefing will also release new consumer research showing that the Green House model is strongly preferred by family caregivers over traditional nursing homes.This is major news for the long term care industry, particularly the for-profit sector, which has not been as quick to embrace culture change alternatives to institutional nursing homes, in part because person-centered models of care have been considered less profitable. It also comes on the heels of research demonstrating the financial feasibility of the Green House model (full disclosure: the model was created by ChangingAging’s Dr. Bill Thomas and we are of course big supporters). Not only does independent research show the model delivers significant improvements in care and satisfaction, it also finds adopters experience higher overall and private pay occupancy rates and increased revenues. Stay tuned for live updates to this post starting at 12:30 pm EST.LIVEBLOG 12:45 PM EST One of the speakers at the briefing, Alice Bonner, director of the Division of Nursing Homes in the Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), said that CMS is committed to supporting innovative culture change models like the Green House Project that “empower elders, include them in decision making and provide real choice.”12:30 PM EST Key Findings: The rate of hospitalization per Green House resident over 12 months was over seven percentage points higher in traditional nursing homes compared to Green House homes. This reduced annual Medicare hospitalization expenditures per resident in Green House homes. Overall Medicare and Medicaid savings ranged from $1,300 to $2,300 per resident annually.Research conducted in 2012 found that residents received 22 percent more direct care time in Green House homes than in traditional nursing homes. Despite this increase, median operating costs of Green House homes are equal to traditional nursing homes.About The Green House Project As Americans age, they worry about finding a place to live happily and comfortably, that provides the care and services they need. Many nursing facilities can feel like hospitals instead of homes, but since 2002, the RWJF-funded Green House Project has pioneered a radically different approach to long-term care. Today, 264 homes are open or under development in 32 states. These Green House homes have been designed from the ground up to look and feel in every way like real homes. Research shows that elders are healthier and happier in Green House homes, which cost no more to operate than traditional nursing homes.Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: green house project Innovation medicaid medicare NCB Capital Impact nursing home rwjflast_img read more

Stealing Hope

No Comments

first_imgby, Anne Basting, ChangingAging ContributorTweet10Share420Share24Email454 SharesI know why they did it. Gene Wilder was a beloved celebrity, and when he died in 2016, the world (that follows western pop culture) felt they lost one of the good ones. He died with Alzheimer’s. They couldn’t resist the power of the celebrity story to convey their message. In 2017, the Alzheimer’s Association in the United States thought up a new marketing campaign called #pureimagination that built on the public’s fondness for Wilder and for his iconic character in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. In the video created for the campaign, we see clips of the film, a technicolor fantasy where sweets grow on trees that bower over a river of chocolate. It is a world of imagination. “Come with me, and you’ll see, a land of pure imagination…”  sings Wonka, ambling calmly through the world he created, the children and their parents greedily chomping on everything they can find. In this video though, the items disappear just as they take a bite. And in the background, candy apples disappear from trees. Multicolor pumpkins filled with jelly fade to nothing. So too, the Alzheimer’s Association is telling us, do we when we have Alzheimer’s.  “Alzheimer’s steals your imagination piece by piece,” it says in bold white letters on the purple background.  “But with your help, imagine how we can end it.”  How will they “end” it?  What is the plan? Forty-seven million people have dementia across the world. This is projected to triple by 2050. Thus far, the only decline in these numbers have been attributed to a bump in the early childhood education of the current generation of elders with the diagnosis – not any of the treatments on the market. Clearly, we need to invest in research to prevent and delay the symptoms. Clearly, we need to better understand how the brain works and what the mechanisms are behind the progression of symptoms. And we need to invest more than we are now. But for those 47 million people who currently have the symptoms, imagination is exactly what works to help them feel connected to themselves and to others around them. Imagination is a remaining strength that can be exercised like a muscle. Family members and friends who mourn the loss of shared stories of the past that connect them to the person with dementia can learn to shift toward creativity to find emotional connection, to play, to create new moments and experiences together. I have not agreed with the Alzheimer’s Association’s fear-based, stigma-fueling marketing campaign for many years. But this one feels particularly egregious. They don’t need to steal the one hope families have for meaningful connection in order to feed dollars into their research machine. I offer my revision: Come with me, and you’ll see, a land of pure imaginationa place where we Can be freeAnd feel comfort and connection. Imagine how we can transform dementia care by infusing creativity into our everyday exchanges, our programming. Imagine how people with dementia can draw their families and friends together again, out of their grief and fear, into the moment of shared imagination. Just imagine. Related PostsThoughts on the Passing of the “Waco Kid”Even without knowing all of the reasoning behind Gene Wilder’s decision to keep his diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease a secret, one can infer from his family’s statement that stigma was a big factor.Trust at StakeThe full text of Eilon Caspi’s recent journal article “Trust at stake: Is the “dual mission” of the U.S. Alzheimer’s Association out of balance?” is now available for free thanks to an anonymous donor seeking to raise awareness of the gross imbalance of effort and funding between the Association’s dual…Alzheimer’s Stigma and Self-Fulfilling PropheciesA new study from UCSD demonstrates the potential of self-fulfilling prophecy for those who live in a world with a highly stigmatized view of dementia.Tweet10Share420Share24Email454 SharesTags: alzheimer’s association Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia Gene Wilder Willy Wonkalast_img read more

New consensus paper serves as basis for uniform medical management of DSD

No Comments

first_imgJun 19 2018Diagnosing, advising on and treating disorders of early sex development represent a huge medical challenge, both for those affected and for treating physicians. In contrast to the earlier view, DSD (Difference of Sex Development) are now regarded as rare and complex disorders with many different clinical manifestations. The aim is to provide interdisciplinary care, depending upon age and severity, rather than immediately performing sex reconciliation surgery in childhood. A new consensus paper produced by European doctors, psychologists, patients and self-help groups is now to serve as a basis for uniform medical management of DSD throughout Europe. Paediatric urologist Alexander Springer from the Division of Pediatric Surgery and paediatrician Stefan Riedl from MedUni Vienna’s Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine were among the participating Austrian representatives. The paper was recently published in renowned journal “Nature Reviews Endocrinology”.People who suffer from the rare condition referred to as “Diverse Sexual Development (DSD) were previously designated as being “intersex”. This means that, for genetic, anatomical or hormonal reasons, they cannot be unambiguously assigned to either the male or female gender. However, DSD is not a clear-cut diagnosis but rather an overarching designation for very different clinical phenomena with diverse biological causes. In contrast to this, from the medical perspective, people who are transsexual can be clearly defined biologically but subjectively feel that they belong to the other gender. It is assumed that one in 1,500 newborns suffers from DSD. This equates to approximately 50 children a year in Austria.Over the past decades, children who could not be clearly assigned to a particular gender often underwent gender-matching surgery at a very early age, often without parents being properly informed about the measures and aims and without knowing the long-term consequences. This situation has continuously improved, due to increasing engagement and self-awareness of the affected adults. In the “Chicago Consensus” of 2005, experts established for the first time that children should only be operated on once their sexual identity was clear and that they should be given intensive medical and psychological care over a long period of time. Nonetheless, there were repeated instances of incorrect diagnosis and treatment.Related StoriesDrug overdoses among adolescents and young adults on the riseNew study could help optimize SSRI dosing and minimize adverse effects in teensOverweight and obese adolescents have similar increased risks of heart disordersAs the outcome of a three-year research project, leading medical experts, self-help groups and affected adults have now produced a new Consensus Paper on the subject of DSD. The aim was to establish a holistic perspective of the broad subject of DSD, taking account of all areas of life such as sexuality, working life and the desire to have children.The basic agreements also include recognition that DSD is a package of tiresome and complex disease phenomena and has hitherto been dealt with in a less than optimal way. According to the MedUni Vienna experts, it was agreed that diagnosis and treatment should only take place in an interdisciplinary setting in specialist medical centers. A consensus was also reached on the fact that DSD is a life-long condition, which needs to be managed for the corresponding length of time. Finally, it was agreed to establish a prospective register, that is to say a multidisciplinary and international database. Says Alexander Springer, pediatric urologist at MedUni Vienna’s Division of Pediatric Surgery: “We have now laid the foundations for establishing uniform management throughout Europe. However, this is just the beginning. We need long-term data and high-quality studies to enable us to determine the optimum treatment for each individual patient. Source:https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/ueber-uns/news/last_img read more

NOAA Gets First Chief Scientist in More Than a Decade

No Comments

Email President Barack Obama today announced that he intends to appoint oceanographer Richard “Rick” Spinrad to become the next chief scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Spinrad would be the agency’s first chief scientist since former astronaut and earth scientist Kathryn Sullivan—now NOAA’s Administrator—held the job in the mid-1990s.The move marks the administration’s second effort to fill the post, which it reestablished in 2009 as a presidential appointment requiring confirmation by the U.S. Senate. (Previous administrations downgraded, eliminated, or refused to fill the position.) But the White House’s initial nominee, geochemist Scott Doney, ultimately withdrew his name in 2012 after a 2-year battle with Republicans in the U.S. Senate. In particular, Senator David Vitter (R-LA) blocked a vote on the nomination to protest the Obama administration’s response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.Because of changes to federal personnel rules, Spinrad will not need Senate confirmation. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Now the vice president for research at Oregon State University (OSU), Corvallis, Spinrad is a known face at NOAA and in Washington. He served as NOAA’s assistant administrator for research from 2005 to 2010 and led its oceans and coastal zone programs from 2003 to 2005. From 1987 to 2003, he worked for the U.S. Navy, including as technical director for the oceanographer of the Navy. He earned his doctorate at OSU.“Rick will do a terrific job,” predicts marine biologist Jane Lubchenco, a former NOAA administrator who returned to OSU in 2013 after 4 years in Washington. “He understands science and politics, has an extensive network of key players and he knows the agency well. I’m delighted this essential position will finally be filled.”“He’s got a lot challenges waiting at NOAA, but having that history [at the agency] makes him a great choice,” says Doney of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. Spinrad, he adds, has “a great combination” of science and management experience. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) read more

Scientists rally to save research laser that Trump has targeted for closure

No Comments

first_imgA laser pulse converges on a target at the heart of the Omega laser facility, as diagnostic instruments look on.  Eugene Kowaluk/University of Rochester Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Daniel CleryMar. 7, 2018 , 4:00 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Scientists rally to save research laser that Trump has targeted for closure Email Fusion is the process of generating energy by melding together light atoms; it requires heating the fusion fuel (hydrogen isotopes) to tens or hundreds of millions of degrees. Inertial confinement fusion achieves this by crushing tiny capsules of fuel with intense laser or magnetic field pulses to achieve the required conditions. The hot, dense plasma produced is also the state of matter created in a nuclear explosion, hence the importance of this field to understanding nuclear bombs in the absence of explosive testing.Omega led the field from 1999 until 2005, when it was overtaken by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, but it continues to do important work refining the fusion process. “Omega does 80% of the shots in this field,” Campbell says.The president’s request also calls for cuts to fusion work at NIF and an immediate axing of funding to the Nike laser at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C. “The loss of NRL and eventual loss of LLE would greatly reduce the physics capability and innovation in the ICF program,” says NRL’s Stephen Obenschain. A program to manufacture fusion targets and support for academic scientists who want to use the facilities would also be cut.Lobbying pushLeaders of the U of R lab are making frequent trips to Washington, D.C., to win over members of Congress who will make the final decision on spending. Researchers from other labs have also been sending letters of support. “They all asked what they could do to help,” says Riccardo Betti, an assistant director at LLE.Omega’s closure would have “irreversible and disastrous ramifications for maintaining the safety and reliability of our nuclear stockpile,” Richard Petrasso of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Plasma Science and Fusion Center in Cambridge wrote in one letter to Representative Joe Kennedy III (D–MA). “Such an action would be calamitous for the field and would largely eliminate, not only for MIT, but for all other universities, the training and education of Ph.D. scientists working in [high energy density physics].”Fifty-one fusion researchers from across Europe signed a letter to Energy Secretary Rick Perry stating: “The Omega lasers … are the world’s most productive facilities in fielding experiments in high energy density physics. They are not only key to the mission of the US national laboratories but also accessible to the larger academic community to carry out experiments that often led to breakthroughs in physics … we petition the US government to reverse this misguided decision.”Lawmakers are alert to the issue. At a hearing yesterday on fusion research held by the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Representative Paul Tonko (D–NY) noted that LLE had been “targeted for severe cuts” in the budget request. “Omega deserves our support,” he added. NIF Director Mark Herrmann, who was giving testimony, said, “It would be a great loss if LLE shut down.” Committee member Representative Bill Foster (D–IL) agreed that it would be “tremendously damaging, especially to NIF.”Senator Charles Schumer (D–NY), the Senate’s top Democrat, is also supporting the lab. He visited LLE on 5 March and said: “Let me be clear, I will work hard to vaporize any efforts to cut or eliminate Rochester’s laser lab.” He also said that he “will be urging Congress to include $75 million worth of federal funding for the LLE” in this year’s appropriations bill, which Congress expects to complete later this month. Physicists and politicians are rallying to the defense of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester (U of R) in New York, an iconic facility in the search for fusion energy that President Donald Trump has proposed defunding.The move to wind down the lab over 3 years, included in the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) fiscal 2019 budget request released last month, came as a bolt from out of the blue. In addition to being a mainstay of efforts to figure out how to use lasers to create fusion energy, the 23-year-old facility also does pioneering work in studying matter at high-energy density. And it has been deeply involved in DOE’s stockpile stewardship program, which aims to ensure the reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons. “We were not consulted, there was no discussion whatsoever,” about the funding change, says E. Michael Campbell, director of U of R’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), which runs the laser. “It makes no sense for the long-term vision of how stockpile stewardship works.”The budget request calls for a 20% reduction in DOE’s inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, which supports Omega, to $419 million. The request would initiate the 3-year phaseout of the LLE by cutting its budget from $68 million in 2017 to $45 million in 2019. (Congress has yet to set the 2018 budget.)last_img read more

Is your dog lying to other dogs about its size

No Comments

first_img Smaller dogs may hoist their legs higher in an attempt to lie about their body size. By exaggerating their own bulk, McGuire says, they could be sending a message to the other dogs: “Stay away from me!” The small dogs may hope to avoid face-to-face interactions with other animals likely to outmatch them in a fight.Still, the dogs may not be lying at all, but instead “overmarking,” says James Serpell, an ethologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Dogs often like to cover up other dogs’ pee with their own, he says. Small dogs may lift their legs higher simply because they’re trying to reach a larger dog’s urine spots.Alternately, Serpell says, the explanation might be as simple as anatomy. Maybe all male dogs lift their legs as high as possible to pee, but small dogs are more limber. Is your dog lying to other dogs about its size? Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Are you calling me a fibber? Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Don’t mess with me! That’s the signal small dogs seem to be sending when they pee on things, according to a new study. Researchers have found that the smaller a pooch is, the higher it lifts its leg to mark lamp posts, trees, and other objects—and these exaggerated urine streams may fool other dogs into thinking a large canine is in the area.“This paper is important because it looks at a neglected aspect of scent marking,” Lynda Sharpe, an ecologist at Australian National University in Canberra, wrote in an email. Sharpe, who was not involved with the work, has studied dwarf mongooses that leave scent marks from their anal glands by doing handstands; she found that small males leave deceptively high marks. It makes sense that dogs would do the same thing, she says. “It would be surprising if numerous species weren’t exploiting the height of scent marks.”Conducting the study wasn’t easy. Betty McGuire, a behavioral ecologist at Cornell University, and her colleagues studied 45 dogs from two shelters in New York. The animals, mostly mixed breeds, were all adult males, because they’re more likely to lift their legs when they pee. The researchers walked them outdoors in areas that included trees, benches, a fire hydrant, and other tempting targets, while recording from behind with an iPhone. Precisely measuring pee spots before they dried—without disrupting the dogs midstream—was a challenge. And whereas some dogs liked to mark trees and poles, others preferred tall grass, where their urine was much harder to find. Some dogs, after sniffing a spot and lifting a leg, missed their targets entirely. By Elizabeth PrestonAug. 8, 2018 , 2:20 PM “We spent an inordinate amount of time out there,” McGuire says.When a dog made a mark, the researchers measured its height, and then measured the angle of the dog’s raised leg from the video. In all, the team analyzed several hundred leg lifts over about 2 years. The dogs’ average urination angles, which ranged from about 85° to 147°, got more extreme as the animals got smaller, the team reports in the Journal of Zoology. Ching Louis Liu/Shutterstock last_img read more

Like humans octopuses want more hugs when high on ecstasy

No Comments

first_imgOctopuses are usually antisocial outside of their mating season, but while under the influence, all four spent several minutes longer with the other octopus than in the solitary chamber or the one with the interesting object, the team reports today in Current Biology. They also tended to hug and put their mouthparts on the cage in an exploratory, nonaggressive way—similar to their mating season behavior.The findings suggest that, despite the huge evolutionary gulf that separates us, humans and octopuses appear to have similar brain chemistry guiding their social behaviors. Still, with such a small sample size, the scientists caution that the results need to be confirmed in other experiments before octopuses are used to investigate the workings of the human brain. But for now, they appear to have discovered a surefire way to liven up an octopus garden party. Like humans, octopuses want more hugs when high on ecstasy By Frankie SchembriSep. 20, 2018 , 11:00 AM Humans and octopuses are separated by 500 million years of evolution, but appear to share one unusual thing in common: Both get high on the party drug ecstasy, according to a new study.  In humans, ecstasy—also known by its chemical name 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)—binds to a protein in neurons. The genetic code for this protein is stored in a gene called SLC6A4. When MDMA docks to this protein, our brain cells start to pump out massive quantities of serotonin, the chemical responsible for the warm and friendly feelings of ecstasy’s high. Octopuses’ genomes also contain a copy of SLC6A4, so researchers wondered whether the drug would have a similar effect on them.The team placed four California two-spot octopuses (Octopus bimaculoides, pictured) in a tank containing a liquefied version of ecstasy, which the animals absorbed through their gills. Next, the scientists placed the octopuses individually into a three-chambered water tank for 30 minutes: one empty; one with a plastic action figure, an object that might pique the octopus’s curiosity; and one with a female or male laboratory-bred octopus under a cage. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Tom Kleindinst Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Men who lived in Spain 4500 years ago left almost no male

No Comments

first_imgThese two skeletons at La Braña in northwest Spain belonged to brothers with dark hair and blue eyes who lived 8000 years ago and were most closely related to hunter-gatherers in Central Europe. Men who lived in Spain 4500 years ago left almost no male genetic legacy today The genetic legacy of men who lived on the Iberian Peninsula 4500 years ago has largely diminished—all of their Y chromosomes, which are passed from men to men, were replaced as new farming cultures swept into the region and drove them out of the gene pool. That’s one of the striking conclusions of the largest analysis of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula. The findings suggest that far from being an isolated cul-de-sac of Europe, Iberia experienced massive changes in ancestry, as waves of hunter-gatherers, farmers, Romans, and others mixed with the local population over the course of thousands of years.The work—a deep dive into the genomes of about 300 people who lived in Iberia from 13,000 to 500 years ago—is “extraordinary in getting so much genetic data from so many individuals in time and space,” says evolutionary biologist Jaume Bertranpetit Busquets of Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain. It “represents the most detailed and long-term genetic documentation of a single region, Iberia, from prehistory into early history,” adds archaeologist Kristian Kristiansen of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Neither was involved in the new research.Iberia was first settled by modern humans some 44,000 years ago. But little is known about how those pioneers contributed to later populations—the oldest DNA comes from hunter-gatherers who date back to 19,000 years in northern Spain. These early hunter-gatherers came in two separate groups that settled in northern and southern Spain and had close ties to hunter-gatherers in Poland and Italy, respectively, according to ancient DNA from 11 hunter-gatherers and early farmers who lived in Iberia from 13,000 to 6000 years ago. Later, the DNA shows, they slowly mixed with incoming farmers from Anatolia, which is in present-day Turkey, researchers led by population geneticist Wolfgang Haak at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, report today in Current Biology. Email By Ann GibbonsMar. 14, 2019 , 3:05 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Younger DNA, from two skeletons dating from between 3600 and 4500 years ago, reveals another element in the Iberian mixture. One was North African and the other had a grandparent with North African ancestry, according to a study today in Science by Iñigo Olalde, a postdoc in the lab of population geneticist David Reich at Harvard Medical School in Boston, and their colleagues.Then, central Europeans who were descendants of herders from the grasslands of Eastern Europe and Russia, appeared in Iberia, starting in the early Bronze Age 4500 years ago. They probably introduced an early Indo-European language (the major family of more than 400 languages spoken in European and Asia today), according to Olalde. At first, the European farmers lived alongside the farmers already in Spain, based on ancient DNA from men buried at roughly the same time in the same places. But within a few hundred years, nearly all the Y chromosomes from Iberian farmers were gone—and replaced by the central Europeans farmers’ DNA.This meant that somehow, the new migrants replaced 40% of genetic heritage of the Spanish and Portuguese. “It would be a mistake to jump to the conclusion that Iberian men were killed or forcibly displaced,” says Olalde, “as the archaeological record gives no clear evidence of a burst of violence in this period.” Perhaps the steppe migrants had far more children than the small population of local farmers, eventually swamping out their DNA, Reich says.Still more immigrants came in historical times: first Romans and then Muslim North Africans. At one point 500 years ago, far more people of North African ancestry lived in Spain than today, before Christian kingdoms pushed the Muslim states south and eventually expelled them. But the DNA suggests the Muslim invaders and earlier migrants didn’t penetrate the remote Basque country in the far north; the Basque people, whose origins have long been a mystery, are one of the few groups in Europe that retained their own non–Indo-European language even after the arrival and mixing with the Central European farmers.“The Basque country is a really difficult place to conquer; there are quotes from French rulers in medieval times saying that this is a nasty place to get in an army,” says population geneticist Mattias Jakobsson of Uppsala University in Sweden, not part of either team. As a result, “The present-day Basques look like Iron Age people from Iberia,” says Olalde, himself a Basque. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Julio Manuel Vida Encinas last_img read more

94yrold Veteran Turns Condemned Village into a Multicolor Wonderland

No Comments

first_imgTaiwan is known for many astonishing things. Besides being home to the one-time world’s tallest building Taipei 101, which is on the radar of firework lovers every December 31st, Taiwan is famous for delicious street food, night markets, the unique pearl milk tea, amazing mountains and flower farms. Newly added to the list of amazing places to visit is the Rainbow Village, and its story is remarkable.Rainbow Grand Pastroy House. Photo by Steven R. Barringer CC BY-SA 4.0Surrounded by high-rising skyscrapers and buildings in a 2.8 million residents city of Taichung, Rainbow Village is a colorful oasis in the concrete jungle.The village was previously known as one of many “veteran villages” that the government erected between the 1940s and 1950s for Taiwanese veterans returning from mainland China.Rainbow Village House. Photo by Katja1031 CC BY-SA 4.0These villages were cheaply built and were intended as temporary settlements for to the Kuomintang soldiers.This specific village was home to 1,200 people, but like many of the veteran villages it started to gradually die out. As residents moved away the investors started to buy the land piece by piece.Taichung, Taiwan – April 5, 2015. The colorful drawing on the walls and floor in rainbow military community or village in Taichung.In last 20 years, the majority of these settlements disappeared completely because the government was selling off the land to investors to provide more quality housing for a bigger amount of people.Nowadays, the Rainbow Village only has 11 houses left and a small number of people still living there. Among them is 94-year-old Huang Yung-Fu, a veteran of the Chinese Civil War.Taichung, Taiwan – April 30, 2018. The Rainbow Village street art.The settlement was recently under threat of being demolished, however, this amazing and creative man saved his peaceful home and the rest of the residents are very grateful for it.It all began when Yung-Fu started to paint the interior of his home with colorful birds. Upon seeing how it turned out, he took his art outside.Taichung, Taiwan – April 30, 2018. The Rainbow Village street art.He would wake up every morning at 3 o’clock, take his painting supplies and go outside to paint the houses and the alleys. His art started on the walls, but it soon spilled to windowsills and sidewalks — Huang was unstoppable.He has painted different motifs, such as animals, dolls, manga characters and airplanes, but all in different vibrant colors. The whole place now looks uniquely magical and surrealistic.April 30, 2018. The Rainbow Village in Nantun District, Taichung, Taiwan.A few years ago, students of Ling Tung University discovered these amazing pieces of art. Gradually, the village started to attract attention both from people living in Taichung and from tourists coming from abroad.The fact that the village started to become a tourist attraction and the protest of the locals supported by all the people enamored by Yung-Fu’s art deterred the Taiwanese government from demolishing it.April 30, 2018. The Rainbow Village in Nantun District, Taichung, Taiwan.Yung-Fu was thrilled that his art was being praised and that he could save his and homes of his neighbours, but he said that he would continue to do it even when he was 100-years-old and nobody even knew of his art.Interestingly, he was never an artist, nor did he try any artistic medium, except for his father teaching him how to draw when he was a young child.Taichung, Taiwan – Oct 27, 2018: The Rainbow grandpa, Huang Yung-Fu, is painting the street in Rainbow Village.Nowadays the Rainbow Village and its creator, often referred to Rainbow Grandpa, is on the map of almost every tourist coming to visit Taiwan.Once there you would need only 10 to 15 minutes to walk through it and see all the amazing painting around. The encroaching high, modern buildings are proof of the threat the village was under.Read another story from us: 91-yr-old Street Artist Grandma Has Turned Her Village into a Stunning Art GalleryThe entrance to this magical place is free. As of recently there is a small souvenir shop selling unique handmade goods based on the Rainbow Grandpa’s artwork and run by his grandson.last_img read more

EU ministers say Brexit delay letter from May too vague

No Comments

first_imgShareTweetSharePinTheresa MayEU ministers have said that a letter from Theresa May requesting a further Brexit delay, through the mechanism of an article 50 extension, is too vague to justify it being offered. In a letter to Donald Tusk, president of the European council, May said the UK would like to delay Brexit until 30 June.She specified that date even though, when she asked for an extension until 30 June last month, EU leaders refused, and set 12 April – next Friday – as the deadline if MPs failed to vote for the withdrawal deal. At the time, the EU also said that, if the UK wanted a further extension beyond 12 April, May would have to explain “a way forward”.In her letter today. May said that she hoped to agree a compromise with Labour and that, if that failed, she might use indicative votes in the Commons to find a way forward. Using similar language, the French, German and Dutch governments all complained that this did not provide enough clarity about how the UK might resolve its Brexit deadlock.last_img read more

Rape against children in India up by five times in 20 years

No Comments

first_img Advertising The report ‘Child Rights in India – An Unfinished Agenda’ states that while India has made great strides on child mortality front, child sex ratio and sexual violence against children remains a concern. Citing National Bureau of Crime records, it states that the absolute number of reported rapes against children has increased approximately five times between 1994 and 2016. The report while acknowledging that the reporting of crime against children has increased maintains that “experts and communities believe that incidents of violence, particularly on younger children, have also gone up”.The report states that child sex ratio has declined from 927(Census 2001) to 919 (Census 2011), and continues to decline in many states of India. It reads, “Decreasing sex ratio, and increase in incidents of rape among girls are the two indicators that demonstrate the increased vulnerability of girls. In all the states, girls reported that their mobility is severely compromised due to safety and security reasons and this does not affect boys to the same extent.”Child mortality, the report points out, is one of the areas where India, which is yet to achieve any of the SDG targets, has demonstrated steady progress and intention to achieve the targets. It adds that India has for the first time in history, reached the current global average of under-five mortality (39 per 1000 live births). Infant Mortality Rates have also come down from 79 in 1992-93 (NFHS-1) – to 41 in 2015-16 (NFHS-4), it adds. It outlines that significant progress has been made also in universal enrolment in primary education with literacy rate among 7-14 years children showing a decadal improvement from 64 per cent to 88 per cent by 2011. 1 Comment(s) child rape, violence against children, child rape cases, india children rape victims, (Representative Image)The absolute number of reported rapes against children has gone up by five times in the last two decades, according to a report released by the alliance of child rights Joining Forces for Children India on Wednesday. Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Top News LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? By Express News Service |New Delhi | Updated: July 4, 2019 7:21:05 am Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, Supreme Court hearing likely from August 2 last_img read more

Climate protesters interrupt speech by UK finance minister

No Comments

first_img Related News May’s plan best for UK economy under Brexit, says Philip Hammond Advertising Hammond responded to the protest as he resumed his speech – which focused on Brexit and banking regulation – shortly afterwards.“The irony of course is that this is the government that has just led the world by committing to a zero-carbon economy,” he said to applause from the audience. Britain to target online giants with new ‘Digital Services Tax’ By Reuters |London | Published: June 21, 2019 11:04:00 am Advertising Several women, wearing red evening dresses and sashes with the words ‘climate emergency’, prevented Hammond from speaking for a few minutes by using loudspeakers to shout slogans during a banquet in London’s landmark Mansion House building.Environmental campaign group Greenpeace said it organised the protest in the heart of the capital’s banking district, accusing the finance industry of funding climate change and the finance ministry of trying to water down government action.“But we are in a #ClimateEmergency – business as usual is no longer an option. That’s why we interrupted the speech tonight,” Greenpeace said on Twitter. climate emergency, climate protests, Philip Hammond, uk finance minister, world news, uk finance minister speech, indian express UK Finance Minister Philip Hammond delivers a speech at the annual Mansion House dinner in London, Britain, Thursday.Climate change protesters briefly interrupted a high-profile speech by British Finance Minister Philip Hammond to leaders of the country’s financial services industry on Thursday. Brexit deal is best option to protect British economy: finance minister Post Comment(s)last_img read more

LK Advani attends Dadas first mahayagna in Pune

No Comments

first_img ‘His body appeared to be made of rubber, he could mould it as he liked…’ Post Comment(s) Related News Advani, who had links with Dada and the Mission, spent at least three hours at the event, sitting silently with folded hands. “On the observance, he chose to remain silent, emphasising that words wouldn’t do justice when encapsulating the memory of Dada,” said a Mission press release. Advani refused to speak to the media.On this observance, Didi Krishna Kumari, sent out a message in remembrance and love, saying, “Today brings with itself boundless blessings. Our thoughts turn to our beloved Dada, just as they do every day, every moment of every day. Exactly one year ago, unfurling his golden wings, he ascended to the Land of Truth. Never could we have thought that our beloved would leave us so swiftly, so suddenly. Day by day, the yearning grows stronger, the longing grows deeper. But nothing, no force can keep Dada away from us. He is not apart from us, he is a part of us.”On July 11, the evening witnessed bhajan renditions by singer Shailendra Bharti. This was followed by a recorded talk of Dada on “overcoming the fear of death”. In it, he spoke of the distinctness between the body and soul. “While the body dies, the soul lives on.” He appealed to all to be fearless in death. Advani visits Dada Vaswani Who was Dada Vaswani? ‘Thus Spake Dada Vaswani,’ and ‘Make the Right Choice’ — two new books and a special edition of East and West Series, a monthly magazine of the Mission, were also released at the event.On July 12 when Dada Vaswani attained “samadhi” last year, prayers were held. A Prabhat Pheri was taken out amidst chants of ‘Hare Ram, Hare Ram, Dada Shyam, Dada Shyam’. “It has been pouring since the last few days and when it did not this morning, I knew it was Dada’s love, yet again, protecting us, shielding us,” said Shobha Budhrani, who had arrived for the Prabhat Pheri from Singapore. “The scene this morning was blessed, I felt so secure and so loved. Every step I took, it felt as though Dada was walking with me. I do not have words to express,” said Neena Daryanani, who had come from Hong Kong.The afternoon session had bhajans, kirtans and sevas. Seva activities were carried out where items were distributed among 19 girl students of St Mira’s, including cash, lunch box, water bottle, pen and pencil.On July 13, akhand kirtans and sevas were conducted in which a month’s ration was distributed to needy families. Artificial limbs were distributed to 33 patients in the Mission, who were a part of the Satara Artificial Limbs Camp. By Express News Service |Pune | Updated: July 14, 2019 7:34:40 am dada jp vaswani, jp vaswani, lk advani, lk advani bjp,bjp leader lk advani, sadhu vaswani mission, former deputy prime minister, advani, india news, Indian Express L K Advani at the Sadhu Vaswani Mission on Saturday. (Express photo)Former Deputy Prime Minister L K Advani Saturday attended the mahayagna held in memory of Dada J P Vaswani at the Sadhu Vaswani Mission on its third day on Saturday. The three-day Mahayagna, the first “in remembrance of the master”, was observed with prayers, sevas and satsangs from July 11 to 13. Advertising Advertisinglast_img read more

Mumbai Bail after 7 years man says said yes to LeT charge

No Comments

first_img 2 LeT men held while trying to buy rifle in Ramban After Pulwama Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Related News US: Lawmaker introduces resolution seeking probe into NGO’s links with Lashkar-e-Taiba The NIA did not respond to calls and text messages from The Indian Express seeking comment. Appearing for the NIA in court, Advocate A M Chimalkar opposed Gaus’s bail plea by contending that there is voluminous documentary evidence against him.According to the prosecution, Gaus and another accused Muzzammil made 214 calls to each other between October 10, 2011, and August 9, 2012. Gaus allegedly also travelled with Muzzammil from Mumbai to Nanded by bus.The prosecution claimed that one of the men had received money from Saudi Arabia, sent by another accused. It was alleged that the accused were found with a revolver and live cartridges, and that they planned to instigate young Muslims to take to violence.In November 2017, the five sought to plead guilty before the trial court. The court, however, rejected their request. Advertising Last week, while granting bail to Gaus, the Bombay High Court observed: “Prima facie, at this stage, we are of the opinion that perusal of material made available to us does not show that there are reasonable grounds for believing that accusations against the appellant/accused no.4 (Gaus) are true.”The Maharashtra ATS filed a chargesheet against the five, including Gaus, for offences punishable under Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, IPC and the Arms Act. In October 2013, the case was transferred to the NIA.READ | Suspected ‘LeT operative’ gets bailGaus (32) told The Indian Express, “The NIA told us that a few accused in a similar case have pleaded guilty before a special court in Bengaluru and sentenced to five years of imprisonment. NIA suggested that we consider pleading guilty. We decided to plead guilty and requested NIA to tell the court to grant us five years of imprisonment as we had already spent that time in jail,” he said. “We were left with no choice but to plead guilty, not because we were guilty, but we had no idea when our case was going to be concluded. We had families to look after. The situation was getting bad.” Advertisingcenter_img In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief mohammad gaus gets bail, suspected LeT gets bail, Bombay High court, Mohammad Gaus, Bombay High court, grants bail to suspected LeT operative, Lashkar-e-Toiba, Mumbai news, Indian Express news Mohammad Gaus was arrested on August 31, 2012.Two years ago, five men arrested on charges of being Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) operatives pleaded guilty before a special court in Mumbai. After seven years of incarceration, Mohammad Irfan Gaus was the first among them to be granted bail this month. After his release from Taloja prison, he has claimed that he was innocent but pleaded guilty to avoid a prolonged trial and worsening of his family’s situation. While rejecting the bail plea of Gaus at the time, the HC observed that “the trial of the case be taken up as expeditiously as possible and in any event, within eight months”. However, Gaus said, only three witnesses were examined in eight months, and the case is still at the stage of the last witness, the investigating officer, being examined.Gaus said he was working at his inverter battery shop before he was arrested in 2012. While he was in jail, his father and brother took care of his wife and his son. NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Best Of Express Written by Sailee Dhayalkar | Mumbai | Updated: July 16, 2019 11:32:06 am 13 Comment(s)last_img read more

DeleteFacebook Movement Gathers Steam

No Comments

first_imgGray Hair Flight Protect Yourself Indignation over Facebook’s role in the data leak has mushroomed since the appearance of the Times story, and some users have taken to Twitter to announce their liberation from the social network.i locked down all app access a long time ago..now i’m clearing my posts, unliking and leaving groups. Facebook will be a shell holding just my email address for friends to contact me..and this picture has been around for a while, you were warned!! #DeleteFacebook pic.twitter.com/xI2yWxDohl— iain (@PlasterAndPixel) March 20, 2018It’s not me, it’s you. Goodbye. #DeleteFacebook pic.twitter.com/OIt6RwpUt0— Rachel Clarke (@doctor_oxford) March 20, 2018I deleted Facebook New Year’s Eve 2014. It was the best decision I’ve made and I can safely say I do not miss it. Life is so much better without it. #DeleteFacebook— Craig (@CEdwardsEsq) March 20, 2018Tempted to #DeleteFacebook but because I haven’t read a scintilla of small print or terms and conditions since I joined, I’m afraid they’ll unplug the fridge or have changed the locks on the house or that it turns out they legally own our children.— Colm O’Regan (@colmoregan) March 19, 2018Meanwhile, Jarrod Alonge pointed out the irony of users of one social network announcing their divorce from another for selling their data.Lol @ all these #DeleteFacebook people, as if Twitter didn’t also collect and sell your personal data on a massive scale.— Jarrod Alonge (@JarrodAlonge) March 20, 2018 Facebook has been in hot water before over allegations of privacy intrusion and misuse of members’ data. It weathered those storms, so it remains to be seen if this latest misstep will cause an exodus of users.However, Facebook appears to be caught up in some disturbing trends. For example, it lost 2.8 million U.S. users under 25 years old last year, eMarketer reported. Since users under the age of 25 have grown up in an age when sharing data has been a fact of life, the Cambridge Analytica affair isn’t likely to accelerate their departure from Facebook, suggested Jason Sarfati, an attorney with Joseph Greenwald & Laake, and a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals.However, that may not be the case for older users.”Older users, particularly those that grew up before the advent of social media, are likely to begin abandoning Facebook at higher numbers,” Sarfati told TechNewsWorld. “Facebook users hailing from Generation X and earlier have always maintained a stronger sense of personal privacy,” he added. “Stories like these only confirm their wariness of social media.”Many Facebook users will choose not to cut the cord.”Facebook has a big problem, but I don’t think users will leave in numbers,”said Elizabeth Lampert, president of Elizabeth Lampert PR.”Facebook is now a part of the everyday culture of millions. There is a lack of another great platform or superior competition,” she told TechNewsWorld.”Facebook has connected people in such ways,” Lampert said, that “it would be hard to replicate the relationships that users have established and keep people connected in the way that it has.” It’s not me. It’s you. Many Facebook members reportedly have shuttered their accounts in the wake of reports that Cambridge Analytica, a voter profiling company working for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, harvested data from 50 million users, unbeknownst to them.The data firm used the information to develop techniques that formed the basis of its work for Trump’s campaign, according to a report published in The New York Times last weekend.Cambridge Analytica bought the data from a researcher who told Facebook he was collecting it for academic purposes, according to the Times.Facebook has suspended Cambridge Analytica, as well as one of its founders, Christopher Wylie, and the researcher, Aleksandr Kogan. However, the firm still has the profile data, according to the NYT story. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. “A lot of the younger generation are no longer using Facebook,” said Vincent Raynauld, an assistant professor in the department of communication studies at Emerson College.”They’re turning to platforms like Instagram and Snapchat. So this is not only about their current user pool — It’s about their future user pool,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Scandals like this are not going to help Facebook seduce this new generation of users,” Raynauld added. Losing Youth Appeal For users who do stay on Facebook, there are ways to bolster privacy protection.Picking your way through Facebook’s privacy settings and tightening down what you want to share and protect is a first step, recommended Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.Deleting the Facebook app from phones and tablets, and instead signing in through a browser, offers some protection, he told TechNewsWorld.”It’s a hassle, and FB will try to lure you back to the app, but many will find the process worthwhile,” King said.”Many of the users whose information ended up in the hands of Cambridge Analytica had zero restrictions placed on their information, despite having the ability to do so using Facebook’s pre-existing security settings,” Sarfati pointed out. “These users simply did not take the time to review their settings.”last_img read more

Researchers succeed in accelerating process of creating 3D images

No Comments

first_img Source:https://www.uni-hannover.de/en/universitaet/aktuelles/online-aktuell/details/news/new-method-to-create-ultrafast-3d-images-of-nanostructures/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 17 2019Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyze complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective. Whilst two-dimensional images can already be generated quickly and in an efficient manner, creating 3D images still presents a challenge. Generally, three-dimensional images of an object are computed from hundreds of individual images. This takes a significant amount of time, as well as large amounts of data and high radiation values.Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerUMD researchers connect a protein to antibody immunity for the first timeScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyA team of researchers from Leibniz University Hannover and other universities has now succeeded in accelerating this process considerably. The researchers developed a method in which two images of an object can be taken from two different directions using a single laser pulse. The images are then combined to form a spatial image – similar to the human brain forming a stereo image from two slightly different images of both eyes. The method of computer-assisted stereoscopic vision is already used in the fields of machine vision and robotics. Now researchers have used the method in X-ray imaging for the first time.”Our method enables 3D reconstructions on a nanometric scale using a single image which consists of two images from two different perspectives”, says Professor Milutin Kovacev from the Institute of Quantum Optics at Leibniz University Hannover, who is one of the co-authors of the study.According to the authors, the method will have a significant impact on 3D structural imaging of individual macromolecules and could be used in biology, medicine, as well as in the industry. For example, the protein structure of a virus could be analysed faster and with very little effort. The protein structure has an immense influence on the function and behaviour of a virus and plays a decisive role in medical diagnoses.The team of researchers from France, Germany, and Portugal has now published the results of the study in the renowned scientific journal Nature Photonics. The project was funded by Laserlab Europe, a consortium of European laboratories that aims to foster interdisciplinary laser research.last_img read more

UCSF Medical Center backs off plan to deepen ties with Dignity Health

No Comments

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)May 28 2019UCSF Medical Center officials said Tuesday they no longer would pursue a formal affiliation with Dignity Health, a large Catholic health care system that restricts care on the basis of religious doctrine.The decision follows months of heated protest from hundreds of University of California-San Francisco faculty and staffers, who argued that such an arrangement would compromise patient care and threaten the famously progressive health system’s reputation as a provider of unbiased and evidence-based care.In a letter to staff announcing the decision to end negotiations, UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood and UCSF Health President and CEO Mark Laret cited “strong concerns about a significantly expanded UCSF relationship with a health care system that has certain limits on women’s reproductive services, LGBTQ care, and end-of-life options.”Dignity hospitals are bound by ethical and religious directives from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Among other prohibitions, Dignity hospitals ban abortions unless the mother’s life is at risk, in vitro fertilization and physician-assisted death. Twenty-four of Dignity’s 39 hospitals prohibit contraception services and gender-confirming care for transgender people, such as hormone therapy and surgical procedures.Under the proposed affiliation, UCSF would have remained independent and continued to provide such services, but UCSF physicians would have had to abide by Dignity’s care restrictions while practicing at Dignity hospitals.The proposal sharply split faculty and the medical staff at UCSF, who aired their differences in heated public forums. Supporters of a closer alliance with Dignity said it would add capacity to a public health care system that is strapped for bed space and turns away more than 800 patients a year. They also noted that Dignity is California’s largest private provider for patients with Medi-Cal, the state-federal insurance program for the poor.Dignity, meanwhile, would have benefited from an inflow of patients at hospitals that often operate under capacity.The two systems already have a relationship among several departments, including neurology, adolescent psychology and pediatric burn care. The new proposal would have deepened the affiliation at Dignity’s four Bay Area hospitals.UCSF said the decision to end negotiations was made over the past several days, following internal meetings with Dignity officials and members of the UC Board of Regents, whose approval was required. In a written statement, a Dignity Health spokesperson said system officials “understand the concerns raised by UCSF faculty and others” and “agree that we cannot move forward.”Related StoriesGender inequality bad for everyone’s health finds researchSupplements claiming to boost brain health are ‘too good to be true’, warn expertsJohns Hopkins experts release digital health roadmapIn April, Laret told a meeting of the UC Regents that UCSF had no “good Plan B” for adding capacity and that disengaging from the partnership would be “catastrophic for the health care delivery system in San Francisco.” On Tuesday, UCSF released an FAQ saying the medical center would continue to look for new ways to work with Dignity, including in the areas of adolescent and adult psychiatry, surgical services, primary care and cancer care.The proposal for formal affiliation had drawn vocal opposition from California’s lieutenant governor, some major UCSF donors and dozens of organizations advocating for reproductive rights and the gay and transgender communities.”I’m really happy they made this decision,” said Dr. Daniel Grossman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology who helped write a letter of opposition that was signed by more than 1,500 faculty members, residents, students and alumni. “Particularly in this moment when the rights of women and LGBT folks are under attack, this [affiliation] was just not the right decision, and I’m glad they recognized that. It’s important that California remain a haven state for these services.”But Grossman said he remains concerned about UCSF’s ongoing collaboration with Dignity, and the possibility it still could expand.”We need to be vigilant and really hold them accountable moving forward,” he said. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Gaming lovers square off in Riyadh eSports tournament

No Comments

© 2018 AFP Citation: Gaming lovers square off in Riyadh eSports tournament (2018, March 4) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-gaming-lovers-square-riyadh-esports.html Explore further Esports officially arrives in Japan, home of game giants Hundreds of Saudi men and women squared off in a video game tournament in Riyadh at the weekend, organisers said, in the conservative kingdom’s biggest ever eSports contest. The eSports tournament—in which players face off on computers instead of turf—was held in the capital from Thursday through Saturday.Organisers said they were flooded with 30,000 registrations for over a little more than 1,300 spots in the competition, highlighting the growing gaming community in the kingdom.Saudi teenagers were among the winners, taking home cash prizes of up to 10,000 riyals ($2,667), organisers said.”eSports is open to everyone, the ultimate equalizer, male or female, big or small, anyone can step up to the challenge, anyone can win,” said Prince Faisal bin Bandar bin Sultan Al-Saud, president of the Saudi Arabian Federation for Electronic and Intellectual Sport.”We have great untapped talent in Saudi… This (is) just the beginning.”The tournament is part of a modernisation drive by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is seeking to balance unpopular subsidy cuts in an era of low oil prices with more entertainment and sporting options.Sports simulation video games are hugely popular in a country of more than 30 million people, the majority of whom are under 25.eSports are to be included as a medal sport for the first time at the 2022 Asian Games in Hangzhou and proponents are pushing for Olympic status. A handout picture made available by the Saudi Arabian Federation for Electronic and Intellectual Sport on March 4, 2018, shows people attending the GSA E-Sports Cup in Riyadh This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

ExTennessee governors Senate campaign fears it was hacked

No Comments

Former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen’s campaign for U.S. Senate told the FBI on Thursday that it fears it has been hacked, amid growing concern that candidates in the 2018 election could be targets of cyberattacks. In a letter obtained by The Associated Press, campaign lawyer Robert E. Cooper Jr. wrote that Bredesen’s aides became suspicious when someone pretending to be the campaign’s media buyer asked for money to be wired to an international account.The letter says the person used an email address nearly identical to the actual media buyer’s and knew about an upcoming TV campaign and its proposed dates. Cooper says the campaign hired a cyber-security firm that found the impostor emails were registered through an Arizona-based registrar.”Thanks to alert action by campaign management, no funds were diverted,” the letter states. “However, due to the fact that the impostors knew the media buy was imminent, we are concerned that there has been an unauthorized intrusion into the extended campaign organization.”The possible hack comes amid warnings from U.S. officials that the 2018 midterm elections could face additional cyber meddling from Russia and others, from both domestic and international sources.The Federal Bureau of Investigation is aware of the matter, but doesn’t comment on whether it does or does not have open investigations, said FBI spokeswoman Elizabeth Clement Webb in the Nashville field office.It’s unclear who may be behind the suspected Bredesen campaign breach or what the motive may have been.The letter says the campaign’s internal review is ongoing. The campaign has since bought the TV ad time and the spot is running.Additionally, Bredesen sent an email to his contact list Thursday telling people not to open a document in a Wednesday email that appears to be from him. He wrote that the fake emails have the domain “bredesens.com,” compared to his “bredesen.com” domain.”On Wednesday afternoon (March 7) you may have received an email, coming from a spoofed email address, that appeared to come from me, asking you to click a link to view a shared document,” Bredesen wrote. “Unfortunately, this email is part of a cyber intrusion into my extended campaign organization, including an unsuccessful attempt to divert campaign funds to offshore accounts. The FBI has been contacted and is involved.””I’m sorry for this inconvenience; this sort of thing is rapidly becoming one of the unpleasant facts of life,” the Bredesen email concludes.Bredesen campaign spokeswoman Laura Zapata said, “We have no further comment at this time.”Bredesen is the likely Democratic nominee for the open seat in Tennessee to be vacated by Republican Sen. Bob Corker. U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is running for the Republican nomination.The race could prove critical in the balance of the U.S. Senate, where Republicans currently hold a 51-49 advantage.Blackburn campaign spokeswoman Andrea Bozek said the campaign was troubled to hear of the possible hacking. To its knowledge, Blackburn’s campaign has not been hacked, Bozek added.”Cyber security is a serious issue, and we must do more to prevent bad actors from being able to access private information,” Bozek said. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Explore further Citation: Ex-Tennessee governor’s Senate campaign fears it was hacked (2018, March 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-ex-tennessee-governor-senate-campaign-hacked.html Guilty plea in governor’s hacked email case (Update) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more