Scholars to discuss Catholicism, Islam

No Comments

first_imgMuslim and Catholic scholars will engage in interreligious dialogue during “The Church and Islam: An International Colloquium at the University of Notre Dame” on Thursday and Friday. Keynote speaker Fr. Samir Khalil Samir, who advises Pope Benedict XVI on Islamic matters, will discuss the relationship between the Catholic Church and Islam Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Andrews Auditorium in Geddes Hall, according to a University press release. Prominent Muslim scholar and president of the World Religions Research Center Dr. Abdolrahim Gavahi will then respond to Samir’s speech. Professor John Cavadini said these two addresses serve as a valuable example of official interreligious dialogue. “It is important not just to talk about [interreligious dialogue], but to actually do it,” Cavadini said. “This is an example of real live dialogue on a theological level. I’d like our students to see it happening.” Friday morning at 9 a.m., Catholic Notre Dame professors Gabriel Said Reynolds and Lawrence E. Sullivan and Muslim scholars Mehdi Azaiez, Rashied Omar and Rasoul Rasoulipour will participate in a panel discussion on respecting each other’s religion in LaFortune Student Center 202, according to the press release. Reynolds and Sullivan will discuss their appreciation for the Muslim faith, and Azaiez, Omar and Rasoulipour will discuss their appreciation for the Catholic faith. Reynolds said this panel discussion will prove individuals can recognize holiness in religions different from their own. “The purpose of this is to show that the more deeply rooted you are in your faith, the more you can recognize the logic and beauty of another religious tradition,” he said. “There are too many examples of believers who don’t recognize this logic and beauty.” Cavadini said he also sees great value in Friday’s panel discussion. “This is a beautiful exercise of the imagination,” he said. Friday afternoon at 3:30 p.m., Samir will return to present a lecture on the relationship between Arab Christians in the East and their Muslim neighbors in DeBartolo Hall 126. “This is often a forgotten, neglected topic,” Reynolds said. Jean-Louis Pierre Cardinal Tauran, whom Pope Benedict XVI delegated to undertake official interreligious dialogues, was originally scheduled to speak Thursday. He canceled due to health reasons less than two weeks ago, Cavadini said. Despite that setback, Cavadini said he is looking forward to the colloquium. “I think it will be a very high profile and interesting event,” he said. “We need all the mutual understanding between Christianity and Islam we can get.”last_img read more

Alumnae discuss working at Google

No Comments

first_img Bradburn encouraged Saint Mary’s students to be mindful of the future, but to live in and enjoy the present. “Work [at Google] is all about innovation and trying new things,” Bradburn said. “There is no such thing as instant perfection.” Google employees Jennifer Bradburn, a 2001 alumna, and Mary Elizabeth Ulliman, a 2010 alumna, spoke to the students about their jobs at the innovative technical company. Ulliman and Bradburn shared their stories of how they found themselves working at Google. For students entering the workplace in the near future, Bradburn said creativity and patience are two crucial traits to remember. “You have a finite amount of time to enjoy here on this beautiful campus,” Bradburn said. “Life is a marathon, not a sprint.” Saint Mary’s students interested in working in digital media learned about the career field and job-seeking process at a presentation by two alumnae Friday. Ulliman said persistence is key when students are trying to obtain jobs. “Set yourself apart in the application process and make the employer notice something unique about you,” Ulliman said. The interview remains one of the most important aspects of the application process, Bradburn said, and students should “make sure the employers can tell that you have researched their company and that you are passionate about working there.”last_img read more

Seniors create Facebook app, connect consumers

No Comments

first_imgSeniors Robb Crow and Kyle Kober never thought a summer wakeboarding trip would create a friendship that changed their career paths. The two met while they were interning in New York City between their sophomore and junior years. “At a Notre Dame networking event, Kyle invited me to go wakeboarding on Long Island, so I stayed at his house for a few days before getting to really know him,” Crow said. “Ever since then, we’ve been best buddies.” Soon after the two became friends, they decided to create ShopTalk, a Facebook application that provides discounts for online shoppers who post their purchases on their Facebook pages. “ShopTalk … allows retailers to tap their online shoppers’ social networks through our unique plug-in application,” Kober said. “By placing our plug-in on the checkout screen, shoppers can post their purchases to their Facebook networks’ news feeds and instantaneously receive a discount provided by the retailer before payment.” Kober brainstormed the initial idea while working at a venture capital firm specializing in e-commerce and retail space, Crow said. “After a few late-night Skype sessions and a few weeks of convincing me, I came on board and we finalized the idea together, creating ShopTalk,” he said. ShopTalk’s design drives traffic to retailers by linking both the purchased products and fan page of the retailer to the post, Kober said. “This process is simple and automatic for the shopper, only requiring them to sign up for ShopTalk with Facebook,” he said. “Ultimately, our mission is to save you money when shopping online, while promoting the interesting products and brands you find on Facebook.” While creating a Facebook application is not simple, Kober said the process has been quick. The pair started development in September. “We are now one month away from our beta launch in which we’ll have a select 25 retailers running the application on their sites,” Kober said. “Both of us don’t have an expertise in software or coding so we’ve been working closely with a team of developers based in New York City to make the idea a reality.” Thus far, the only investors in ShopTalk are Crow and Kober’s close friends and family. “We are in the process of raising an angel round [second round of investors], and are aiming to close the round by early December this year,” he said. “We are finding angels through our connections here at ND and also through one of our advisers in New York.” Crow said neither senior imagined they would be involved in entrepreneurship after graduation. “A year ago if you asked both of us what we wanted to do after graduation our answers would have been investment banking or private equity,” he said. “We have had more passion working on ShopTalk than we have had in any of our previous finance internships.” The Facebook app will not be the end of the friends’ business partnership, Crow said. “Our discount sharing app is a stepping stone for bigger and better things for ShopTalk,” he said. “At the beginning of next year we will begin phase two of development, creating a desktop and mobile app for our users.”last_img read more

Notre Dame builds connections in South Asia

No Comments

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins signed a formal agreement with St. Xavier’s College in Mumbai, India, that includes plans for study abroad programs, summer research programs, faculty exchange and research collaboration, according to a Feb. 6 press release.“Father Jenkins also signed similar memorandums of understanding with St. Stephen’s College in Delhi and the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, earlier this week during a trip to India and Bangladesh that aims to strengthen Notre Dame’s academic engagement with South Asia,” the statement said.Kenneth Henderson, senior assistant provost for internationalization, said the University wants to form more connections with international universities.“What we’re interested in is partnering with the very best universities around the planet, both for undergraduate exchange programs as well as research exchange programs,” he said. “Currently we don’t have a very strong connection in South Asia. We do have significant connections in China, but in India and elsewhere in Asia not as much.”The relationships with St. Stephen’s College and St. Xavier’s College will primarily focus on undergraduate and faculty exchanges, while the relationships with the Indian Institutes of Technology [IITs] at Bombay and Gandhinagar will center on research, Henderson said.“The two private institutions, St. Stephen’s and St. Xavier’s, are somewhat similar to Notre Dame in that they are private and religious-based schools, and with excellent undergraduate reputations,” he said. “Those are places where we will invest in setting up exchange programs, more than likely at the undergraduate level.”St. Stephen’s College is Anglican, Henderson said, while St. Xavier’s College is Catholic.“The key element for the choice is that St. Xavier’s is the premier Catholic university in India, and therefore we’re interested in partnering with the best universities,” he said. “Obviously if they are religious-based institution, that makes it even more interesting to us because we have a shared connection.”Henderson said the Indian Institute of Technology at Bombay also has an excellent reputation.“[It] is well-established as one of the best technical universities in the world,” he said. “The IITs are all elite institutions, so they are more likely to be of interest to us in a research capacity by setting up collaborative research. We can certainly do exchanges, but it’s more likely to be at the undergraduate level.”“The IITs were chosen specifically because they are the best research institutions in that area,” Henderson said. “Again, the idea is that Notre Dame is partnering with the very best institutions all over the world.”Tags: Asia, India, International, John Jenkins, Notre Damelast_img read more

Reilly weekend shows students academics, dorm life, service

No Comments

first_imgEmily McConville This weekend, students from across the country traveled to Notre Dame to participate in the Reilly Visitation Program from April 5-8 to learn more about the University and experience student life firsthand.Associate director of admissions Gabe Brown said participants in the Reilly program include the top one percent of students in the University’s applicant pool.“These are students with lots of college options so they’re being admitted to some of the best colleges and universities in the country,” Brown said. “We’re trying to show them some of the best Notre Dame has to offer over the course of about three days in hopes of having them enroll next fall.”The Reilly program was originally created through the transformation of a scholarship fund that paid partial tuition for one student, Brown said.“We thought it might … affect more top academic students by using that money for a visit weekend,” he said. “The donor agreed, and we were able to use that funding to be able to provide a visit weekend for some of our top admitted students.”Reilly is an all-expense-paid program. Brown said this weekend is the second of two weekend experiences Notre Dame offers each year in the spring semester.Those who attend not only have great academic records, but also are dynamic through their involvement in extracurricular activities, he said. Reilly Weekend gives students the opportunity to see if Notre Dame truly is the right fit for them.“I think it’s important to ask them what types of things they’re looking for in a school, what factors are important to them,” Brown said.He said the program allows students to see the academic challenge the University offers along with the spiritual aspect and “community atmosphere that’s unlike just about any other place in the country.”“I think the reason so many people are passionate about Notre Dame is the people, and the people really make the place,” Brown said.He said it’s important to let the participants know that the faculty and staff are there to support them throughout their time at Notre Dame with everything from undergraduate research to study abroad to starting various clubs and organizations.“You’re always just surrounded by this great community and great people while you’re here,” he said.According to the Reilly website, students participate in welcome dinners, presentations, various activities, student panels, classes and multiple tours as part of the Reilly experience.“I hope that they see an accurate portrayal of what life at Notre Dame is like,” Brown said. “I hope they see all the things that we can offer, not only in that dimension of great, high powered academics, but that there’s a commitment to service.”Senior Antoinette Pusateri, former Reilly participant and current member of the Reilly student committee, said one of the big program events that demonstrates this commitment to service occurs on Sunday and includes a tour of the Center for the Homeless.“We tour the Center for the Homeless, and we get to speak to some of the staff and residents there,” she said. “We want to portray how big and integral the part of service is in giving back to the community for Notre Dame.“We were excited for it, and it’s been well received. To students, the idea of giving back for the gift we’ve been given resonates with them.”Another event Pusateri said students tend to enjoy is the closing press box dinner.“It’s the big conclusion to the weekend. On Monday night, we have dinner in the press box and have a professor address everyone [with a] ‘nowhere else but Notre Dame’ kind of speech,” she said. “The sun is setting over the golden dome and the students’ names are on the scoreboard.”Pusateri, who has worked on the committee since her freshman year, said this weekend marks her ninth Reilly experience, including the one she attended as a high school senior.“I’ve kind of been spearheading it this year and last year, and it’s just really incredible every year just how talented but how humble these students are,” she said. “It’s a great spirit that the group has.”The admissions counselors and student committee panel work together closely to plan this amazing program, she said.“Together with the Reilly alumni, we basically just help facilitate this weekend,” Pusateri said. “We could not do this without the Reilly alumni who help because they’re kind enough to open their rooms and their hearts to the Reilly [prospective students] for the whole weekend.”Past Reilly students host the high school seniors, answer their questions and make them feel at home, which she said is the number one task.“The Reilly alums come out of the woodwork to help and really make these students’ Reilly as fantastic as ours was,” she said.Although she wanted to go to Notre Dame since she was eight years old, Pusateri said Reilly gave her the opportunity to see herself as a student holistically for the first time at the University.“[With] Reilly, just from the dorm community to the faith life here on campus to eating in the dining hall to going to class in Jordan Hall to going to a basketball game, I got to get the full spectrum.”After this, she said she didn’t see any other college option besides Notre Dame.“When I left [Reilly weekend], I didn’t want to leave. I would have been perfectly content with staying, not going back to high school. That’s how much I loved it,” she said. “Absolutely, Reilly was a huge thing. You feel a part of something much bigger than yourself.”The greatest piece of advice Pusateri said she could give to Reilly students this weekend is to listen to their hearts in making their college decision.“This is one of the toughest decisions, picking a college,” she said. “I think, going through four years of college and looking back, how much you learn outside the classroom, let alone in the classroom, about yourself and the people around you, I think it is a very big decision.“I think each individual has to look at their own situation, you know what they’re looking for, the person they want to be in four years and how will this university help them in achieving that personal development, academically, spiritually, emotionally. The people that you meet and the experiences that you have will last a lifetime.”Pusateri also said students should be open-minded and learn everything they can about each university they apply to.“These students are among the top in the nation and they have the most incredible opportunities to various different elite places so I just recommend that they … think about what they truly want out of an education and how this four-year decision will impact the next 40 years,” she said. “Hopefully they decide that Notre Dame is the place for them.”Tags: Reilly Visitation Programlast_img read more

Super Sibs club offers mentorship opportunities

No Comments

first_imgNotre Dame provides a wide variety of service opportunities in which students can engage, yet one club in particular focuses on a highly-original opportunity. Super Sibs is a service club on campus that allows students who have siblings with disabilities to mentor children in the community who also have siblings with disabilities.Adam Kourajian, a Notre Dame senior and president of Super Sibs, said the club is one of the most unique clubs on campus.“It has a — I guess you could say — a bit of a high bar of entry,” Kourajian said. “What we do is we take students who have siblings with physical or mental disabilities … and we work with kids in the South Bend, Mishawaka [and] Michiana areas who also have siblings with disabilities.”Kourajian said the club was formed several years ago by 2011 Notre Dame alumnus  Soeren Palumbo. The club grants students the opportunity to relate to other children who have a sibling with a disability and act as mentors for the children.“The whole idea is you know, ‘I’ve been there, I’ve done that,’ … We can talk about the difficulties of perhaps traveling as a family with a disabled sibling or perhaps the difficulties of family reunions, and just awkward social situations and the different sibling dynamic that is often associated with growing up with a sibling with a disability,” Kourajian said.Kourajian said the club organizes several different activities throughout the year with the children the members mentor.“We meet up with the kids about five or six times a semester,” Kourajian said. “Our best-received event is when we eat at South Dining Hall with the kids. They love it. Otherwise, we meet up and we do Sib Chats. … We play games with the kids and we also have discussions surrounding the unique family situations that everyone finds themselves in.”Kourajian said that the club, while focused on the children, is also a worthwhile experience for the students involved.Elizabeth DeLucia, a sophomore and treasurer of the club, said the club has been a successful and enjoyable extracurricular activity.“When we get to come together and talk about our experiences growing up with siblings with disabilities, it helps us realize that some of us have very similar experiences,” DeLucia said “It’s a lot of fun. They’re really cute kids, and it’s fun hanging out with them.”Looking forward, Kourajian said his main focus is advertising and growing the club’s membership.“[Currently] we have about 10 students in the club, and then we have about 15-20 kids who are there at any given night, ages 7-15.” Kourajian said. “Expansion is my number one goal.”Kourajian said having a sibling with a disability is necessary in order to relate to the children, but it makes finding students for the club difficult.“It is such a unique opportunity. If you could do it, I think it would really be a waste if you didn’t do it, both for yourself and the children you could have a positive impact on,” Kourajian said. “Every Notre Dame student wants to do some form of service, right? So, why not do a form of service that you are uniquely qualified to do?”Kourajian strongly encourages students who have a sibling with a disability to email him at akouraji@nd.edu.Tags: Alumni, Children, club, disability, Super Sibslast_img read more

Saint Mary’s Community marches in solidarity with Ghana students

No Comments

first_imgSaint Mary’s students and staff gathered on Wednesday to walk a mile in solidarity with the Holy Cross community in Ghana. The Saint Mary’s Community did not let the rain drown out its joy as its gathered in the rain-out location Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex to walk 10 laps around the track. The original plan was to walk through the nature reserve on campus.Julie Schroeder-Biek, the director of athletics and a member of the planning committee, said in an email that the Sisters were her motivation to help plan this event.“The Sisters do such wonderful work,” she said. “I enjoy doing what I can to support their missions.”Other attendees had different reasons for showing up to walk: They said they were moved not just by the Sisters, but also the students in Ghana.Sophomore Mia Williams said her motivation for participating was “to stand in solidarity with the kids who have to walk long miles to school.”“We came because it seemed like a great way to support the Sisters and the Holy Cross community,” Saint Mary’s campus minister Jessica Kimmet said. “I am an employee here and this was a good opportunity for [my son] to think about and be exposed to ways that he might help children in other places of the world, and he really likes buses.”Some participants came out of moral obligation.“I decided that I haven’t donated my time and energy to anything for a while this sounded like a good opportunity for that,” sophomore Regina Novy said.Others had less altruistic motives.“I just came for the exercise,” sophomore Theresa Bridge said.A handout written by Daniel Flowers, the assistant director of development for the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, says that the fundraiser hopes to raise enough money to help provide transportation to Our Lady of Holy Cross School in Kasoa, Ghana. The school is sponsored by the Sisters of the Holy Cross.“The school currently has six buses for nearly 1,000 students with five buses owned by the school and one rented,” Flowers wrote. “Enrollment at the school has doubled over the last five years, leaving some students without access to bus transportation.”The document says that the bus would help to improve attendance, academic success and safety by eliminating the need for students to walk long distances or ride on dangerous commercial forms of transportation including motorbikes.The walk has the moral goals of bettering lives for students in Ghana. It also has very defined financial goals.“Through our communities coming together, we hope to raise enough money to purchase a bus for the school – $63,000,” Schroeder- Biek said. “If we can raise $31,500, we have an incredibly generous and anonymous donor that will match that.”The walk is an effort to show solidarity with the struggle of these children to try and experience a little of what they experience every day. To show this solidarity, each person participating in the walk will represent one of the students.“Each walker will wear the name tag of one of the children from Our Lady of Holy Cross School (OLHCS),” Schroeder-Biek said. “We will walk for that child.”Many attendants were excited to the attendees’ dedication to the Saint Mary’s community abroad.“It’s really exciting to see the response,” Schroeder-Biek said. “The Sisters shared the need for a new school bus and our community — the College, the Convent and the students — are responding. It is energizing to witness the unity, generosity, care and concern of our community.”The walk contributed to the Saint Mary’s community since it is a small way to connect the Holy Cross community here and abroad. It also offers a chance for communicate with people they might not otherwise.“It strengthens the bond between the Convent and the College by joining together,” Schroeder-Biek said. “We have faculty, staff, students, Sisters and convent staff that are registered to walk together in solidarity for these children.”Besides gaining the opportunity to walk with people that they do not always have the change to, Schroeder-Biek also said that students will gain a lot from being a part of this event including, “a sense of community and the recognition of the day to day struggles the students we are walking for face in just trying to get to school.”Tags: Ghana, Sisters of the Holy Cross, solidaritylast_img read more

Notre Dame junior named 2020 Truman Scholar

No Comments

first_imgNotre Dame junior Patrick Hidalgo McCabe has been named a 2020 Truman Scholar, the University announced in a press release Wednesday. McCabe is studying political science and Arabic with a minor in peace studies. A native of Vienna, Virgina, McCabe is also a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Kellogg International Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a Boren Scholar. On campus, McCabe has served as communications coordinator for the Office of Community Engagement and Outreach within Notre Dame Student Government, social media manager for the Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns and as a research assistant with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. He also helped plan the first student trip to the Women’s March in Washington D.C.According to the release, McCabe hopes to use this opportunity as a Truman Scholar to obtain a master’s degree in public affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and eventually work in diplomacy in the Middle East and North Africa.McCabe is the ninth Notre Dame student to be named a Truman Scholar since 2010, three of which went out to become Rhodes Scholars.In the release, McCabe thanked his family and the Notre Dame community for their support.“I look forward to representing Notre Dame as a Truman Scholar and to building on these opportunities to pursue a graduate degree in international affairs,” McCabe said.Tags: international affairs, Student government, truman scholar, Women’s Marchlast_img read more

Post Office Not Anticipating Disruption Due To Virus

No Comments

first_imgPhoto: PixabayWASHINGTON – The U.S. Postal Service is reporting no disruptions to mail service in the face of the Covid-19 virus.A statement at the Postal Service web site said all Center for Disease Control recommendations are being followed.The USPS posted certain mailings to and from China and Hong Kong could be delayed because of the lack of flights into and out of those countries.A recording at the Jamestown Post Office repeats the message, saying the situation is being monitored. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

Jamestown Police Probe Wednesday Shooting On Falconer Street

No Comments

first_imgStock Image.JAMESTOWN — Jamestown Police are investigating a reported shooting incident that occurred Wednesday evening in the Falconer, Bowen streets area.According to police, a report of several shots being fired at about 9 p.m. was reported to the department. Officers at the scene located multiple shell casings in the area that were fired from a semi-automatic pistol. Investigators are working to obtain information on the shooting and at this time, there are no known injuries.Anyone with information on this shooting is asked to contact the Jamestown Police at 483-7537 or via the Anonymous Tips Line at 483-Tips (8477) or the Tips 411 App. All calls and tips are kept confidential. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more